Archive for the ‘Space Travel’ Category

Telecommunications for Space Tourism

Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

Alan Parsons Projects asked the question

 

Where do we go from here?

 

For those of you in London, that attended the Inmarsat Developer Conference last week, the closing message from SpaceX COO Gwynne Shotwell to Inmarsat’s Michele Franci, CTO was clear, we are going to Space, we are going to settle on Mars.

avatar for Michele Franci - Chief Technology Officer, Inmarsat

Michele Franci – Chief Technology Officer, Inmarsat

Michele Franci, CTO, Development and Engineering, is responsible for the Inmarsat space and ground infrastructure (network and access technology), and product and service development. He is also in charge of the delivery of the Global Xpress programme, bringing it to its commercial launch, including regulatory and market access programs.

avatar for Gwynne Shotwell - President and Chief Operating Officer, SpaceX

Gwynne Shotwell – President and Chief Operating Officer, SpaceX

As President and COO of SpaceX, Gwynne Shotwell is responsible for day-to-day operations and for managing all customer and strategic relations to support company growth. She joined SpaceX in 2002 as Vice President of Business Development and built the Falcon vehicle family manifest to more than 70 launches, representing nearly $8 billion in revenue. Shotwell is a member of the SpaceX Board of Directors.

http://www.inmarsat.com/inmarsat-developer-conference-2016

As seen below British astronaut Tim Peake is having his Selfie taken on his first space walk on the ISS. But has anyone started planning for how we are going to send selfies when we start going on our space holiday’s there?

Space Selfie.PNG

The highlight was keynote speech in the morning 1st March from the Rosetta Mission. It was really interesting to get to have an informal chat to Dr Matt Taylor on what could be described as the coolest project ever to work on in and out of this world.

avatar for Matt Taylor - Rosetta Mission Scientific Support Office, European Space Agency

Matt Taylor – Rosetta Mission Scientific Support Office, European Space Agency

Matt Taylor was born in London, gained his undergraduate Physics degree at the University of Liverpool, and a PhD from Imperial College London. After post doctoral posts at Mullard Space Science Laboratory (part of UCL) and also Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA, he began his time at ESA in 2005, working as the Project Scientist for Cluster and the ESA-China Double star mission. Most recently, in 2013, he was appointed the Project Scientist on the Rosetta mission.

 

According to one of the sessions London is awash with venture capital right now for projects. Developers, Investors and Government sat side by side to think about new solutions & debate where to next?

 

It is clear one challenge faces the emerging space industry in the UK, the debate about Britain leaving the EU, the Horizon 2020 funding programs will need some navigation if UK leave the EU.
ESA confirmed that UK in or out of EU would continue on as business as usual as they work with nations such as Norway & Canada already.
 

Continuing with the Alan parson’s project the track Apollo samples a quote from Kennedy featured below
 

First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth. No single space project in this period will be more impressive to mankind, or more important for the long-range exploration of space;

 

The next most important project for mankind, might just be around the corner.

The establishment of 100% Safe & Secure space tourism transport, is just one of necessary things to be in place so we can one day send selfies from Mars to Earth.

How we get there, get a telecommunications network built in space and then on Mars needs the combined collaboration efforts of all countries to create and fund innovation around space projects and ideas from around the world.

#SpaceRocks

NASA DSN (Deep Space Network) Canberra turns 50 in 2014

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014

NASA DSN Canberra celebrates 50 years this year @CanberraDSN https://twitter.com/CanberraDSN

Australia is host to 1 of 3 listening posts for NASA’s deep space network http://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/

Deep Space Network 46 #DSS46

2014-05-25 16.31.18

Canberra NASA listening post  is most famous for their retired antenna deep space network 46. This antenna received the first images of Neil Armstrong walking on the moon. This retired antenna started life 1965 at Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station for the Apollo missions. Its small dish X Y configuration makes it ideal for tracking near earth spacecraft and when in commission moved rapidly.

 

Deep Space Network 34 #DSS34

antennapg_dss34

Deep Space Network 34 can be maintained while tracking transmission and reception equipment was built underground in 1997 when it was constructed.

 

Deep Space Network 33 #DSS33

2014-05-25 16.15.56

This is the largest steerable parabolic antenna  in the southern hemisphere and uses X, S ,L  K, Ku bands. Constructed between 1969 and 1973, it rotates on a film of oil approx. 0.17m and weighs 3000 tonnes.

2014-05-25 16.32.51

A short history of Deep Space Network

The human fascination with the world around them has prompted the exploration of our planet, from climbing the highest mountains, to plunging the greatest oceans depths. Equally, our fascination with the universe around us has taken humanity from the relatively safe confines of the Earth’s biosphere into the black, unforgiving vacuum of space. The space race began on the 4th October 1957, when the former Soviet Union launched a rocket carrying a tiny 83.6kg aluminium sphere named Sputnik-1 into Earth orbit. For the first time an object built on Earth was in space – the first artificial satellite. On 2nd January 1959, the Soviet Union launched the Luna 1 spacecraft, followed on the 3rd of March by the United States with the launch of Pioneer 4. Escaping the Earth’s gravitational pull, they reached the Moon, passing above its surface before eventually going into an orbit around the Sun. These two craft heralded the advent of interplanetary travel. The scientific community could now seriously begin looking towards the Moon and the planets as objects of exploration. To accomplish this, a communications network was needed that could receive and transmit information and instructions between the spacecraft and controllers back on Earth. Early attempts by the US Army to launch robotic spacecraft were supported through a series of ground stations set up in California, Nigeria, and Singapore, that were managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In December 1958, JPL was transferred from the US Army to the newly formed NASA, and a decision was made to form a more comprehensive arrangement of receiving stations, the Deep Space Network. These stations would be responsible for the tracking and relay of information between mission operations centres at JPL and their interplanetary spacecraft.

You can keep up with testing #dsn #DSS35 testing continues. Watch on webcam http://1.usa.gov/1hwZaFd and on DSN Now http://1.usa.gov/1iKgZhB

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Bored of Earth Get Ready for a 9 year One Way Trip to Mars

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

Mars One is taking applications for a 9 year One Way Trip to Mars

https://apply.mars-one.com/

Here are some of the criteria you need before applying to literally a job offer out of this world.

http://www.mars-one.com/en/faq-en/21-faq-selection/251-do-i-qualify-to-apply

What are the qualifications to apply?

Qualifications

In 2013 Mars One will conduct a global search to find the best candidates for the first human mission to Mars in 2023. On Mars, the primary responsibility for the astronauts is to keep everything, and everyone, up and running. This will be a particular challenge for the first teams. They will need the skills to solve any potential problem – some of which will be completely unforeseeable. Their combined skill sets of each team member must cover a very wide range of disciplines. The astronauts must be intelligent, creative, psychologically stable and physically healthy. On this page, we offer a brief introduction to the basics of our astronaut selection process.

The astronaut selection process

In spaceflight missions, the primary personal attributes of a successful astronaut are emotional and psychological stability, supported by personal drive and motivation. This is the foundation upon a mission must be built, where human lives are at risk with each flight.

Once on Mars, there is no means to return to Earth. Mars is home. A grounded, deep sense of purpose will help each astronaut maintain his or her psychological stability and focus as they work together toward a shared and better future.

Mars One cannot stress enough the importance of an applicant’s capacity for self-reflection. Without this essential foundation, the five key characteristics listed below cannot be utilized to the fullest potential.

Five Key Characteristics of an Astronaut

Characteristic Practical Applications
Resiliency
  • Your thought processes are persistent.
  • You persevere and remain productive.
  • You see the connection between your internal and external self.
  • You are at your best when things are at their worst.
  • You have indomitable spirit.
  • You understand the purpose of actions may not be clear in the moment, but there is good reason—you trust those who guide you.
  • You have a “Can do!” attitude.
Adaptability
  • You adapt to situations and individuals, while taking into account the context of the situation.
  • You know your boundaries, and how/when to extend them.
  • You are open and tolerant of ideas and approaches different from your own.
  • You draw from the unique nature of individual cultural backgrounds.
Curiosity
  • You ask questions to understand, not to simply get answers.
  • You are transferring knowledge to others, not simply showcasing what you know or what others do not.
Ability to Trust
  • You trust in yourself and maintain trust in others.
  • Your trust is built upon good judgment.
  • You have self-informed trust.
  • Your reflection on previous experiences helps to inform the exchange of trust.
Creativity / Resourcefulness
  • You are flexible in how an issue / problem / situation is approached.
  • You are not constrained by the way you were initially taught when seeking solutions.
  • Your humor is a creative resource, used appropriately as an emerging contextual response.
  • You have a good sense of play and spirit of playfulness.
  • You are aware of different forms of creativity.

Age

The astronaut selection program will be open for applicants who are 18 years or older.

Medical and Physical Requirements

In general, normal medical and physiological health standards will be used. These standards are derived from evidence-based medicine, verified from clinical studies. The applicant must be free from any disease, any dependency on drugs, alcohol or tobacco, must have the normal range of motion and functionality in all joints, visual acuity in both eyes of 100% (20/20) either uncorrected or corrected with lenses or contact lenses, free from any psychiatric disorders. It is important to be healthy, with an age- and gender-adequate fitness level. Blood pressure should not exceed 140/90 measured in a sitting position. The standing height must be between 157 and 190 cm.

Country of Origin & Language

Mars One accepts applicants from any country in the world. It is possible to apply in one of the 11 most used languages on Internet: English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Russian, Arabic, Chinese Mandarin, Korean, Indonesian, Japanese. The official language will be English. Nevertheless, when a candidate applies for the selection program, it is not necessary for him or her to possess an extensive knowledge of English: we will provide candidates with documentation in different languages. As applicants progress through the selection procedure, requirements on their English skills will increase.

Read more about the plan here http://www.mars-one.com/en/mission/summary-of-the-plan

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